Choice Lines and Whole Poems

This is my first reading of any e.e. cummings poems. I had known of his work, his famous small-capped letters, daunting space and rhythmical ribboned lines, as if his typewriter chittered and chattered like a coal-engine on break. I am fascinated by how his words freshly play, so dazzlingly display on paper, obedient to his hand.

All selections contained in this post are extracted from my current reading of erotic poems, e.e. cummings.

poem xi. And in particular “reckless oral darkness”

poem ix. And in particular “flower of madness on gritted lips”

poem xvi. And in particular “pink propaganda of annihilation”

poem xxi. Is an incomplete Picasso in words… a poem to introduce capital letters. Although i see several of his poems incorporate such steeds; the brave few letters to stand tall.

My favorite poem today is xiv. Photo follows.

This book of poems is a must on the poetry bookshelf. A sin to read and not to have read sooner.

jπŸ§‘πŸ•Š

Poetry

11 Comments Leave a comment

  1. It is interesting to remark that it was the technology that enabled the form. Charles Olson in his essay Projective Verse uses cummings as an example of this enabling. He explains that at last the poet has a stave on which to compose. The form then becomes an extension of the content. Without the technology though, it would have been less likely cummings would have written in this scattered, free style. This is not to belittle in anyway his achievements but more to illustrate how he incorporated the technology into the method of composition. So it perhaps wouldn’t have been “obedient to his hand” in respect to the action of writing, but the action of typing.

    • Daniel, That really makes a lot of sense… to think it was the mechanical that produced the form versus the laborious hand, written with ink. Perhaps it was the clanking sound of the keys that sparked e.e. cummings mind. Kind of how one walks differently when listening to a train go by… it sparks movement. Wonderful contribution!! Thanks πŸ˜πŸ§‘πŸ•ŠπŸŽΆπŸŽΆπŸŽΆ

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